Month: December 2017

Decorate with Dog Safety in Mind

Published On: December 18, 2017

The holiday season is finally here! Besides all the presents, parties, and fun times with the family, it’s time to decorate your house. No matter which holiday you and your family celebrate, you’re sure to have festive decor you’ve been waiting to pull out of the closet. However, consider dog safety before unleashing potentially hazardous items in your home.

Some holiday decorations aren’t the safest for dogs. Not only will some be easily destroyed, but others could be highly toxic for your pup. Thankfully, we’ve got some great suggestions to help you decorate safely while keeping your pooch in mind.

dog safety holidays

Image Source: Pixabay

Be careful with these decorations

Traditions dominate the holidays. Whether they can be traced back for centuries or just something your family has always done, these traditions can prove risky for your dog.

The Daily Treat explains that lights can be a big problem for dogs. If your pet likes to chew on things, the cord for a set of colorful lights can offer quite the invitation. That’s clearly a danger, plus a frayed electrical cord could easily start a fire. Other traditional decorations to watch for are tinsel and ornaments hanging low enough for a dog to reach. If accidentally swallowed,  these can lead to intestinal blockages and a trip to the ER.

If you enjoy lighting candles as part of your holiday decorations, be mindful of your four-legged friend. Keep anything with a flame up out of reach or on stable furniture or shelves that can’t be toppled. Alternatively, consider flameless candles to help achieve the holiday ambience you’re looking for without the safety hassles.

What about a tree?

For families who include a tree among their holiday decorations, it’s important to be mindful of your canine companion. As Hartz explains, fallen pine needles are easily eaten by dogs but can’t be digested. This can cause your pet to vomit or even need surgery to clear an obstructed intestine. In addition, the water in the tree stand can even poison your dog.

Artificial trees can also be hazards. If small parts break off, these can be chewed and swallowed, also creating intestinal issues. If you want a tree for the holidays, be watchful of your dog, especially if she’s extra curious.

Remember too that some plants like mistletoe and poinsettias are toxic to animals, so make sure they are placed in the middle of a table or on a high shelf for optimal dog safety.

Protect Your Dog This Holiday

For you and your pup, the holidays should be a time of fun and relaxation. Make sure you have both this season when it comes time to decorate. Be careful about wires and candles, put delicate items up high and consider keeping your pet away from the holiday tree. Follow these dog safety tips to have a worry-free holiday! 

Written by Guest Blogger Aimee Lyons

DIYDarlin.com alyons@diydarlin.com